Dear Journalists of Canada: Start Reporting Climate Change as an Emergency

A five-point plan for mainstream media to cover fewer royal babies and more of our unfolding catastrophe. By Sean Holman 28 May 2019 | TheTyee.caSean Holman covered B.C. politics for 10 years and is now a journalism professor at Mount Royal University in Calgary. He produced Whipped, a documentary on the corrosive effects of party discipline, and is now writing [...]

Sustainability: Is the Mount Everest gridlock a metaphor for our planet?

Thank you for your insights and now if we could only start listening and acting accordingly.

Robby Robin's Journey

The pictures that emerged this past week of the long line of climbers waiting their turn to get to the summit of the tallest mountain on our planet was staggering to behold. This is perhaps the most remote and inhospitable place in the world. Those people were waiting in frigid temperatures, requiring oxygen tanks to breath, and they were waiting in line – kind of like the lunch line in the high school cafeteria or the line waiting for the door to open at a popular store for shopping deals on Black Friday – and they waited for up to 12 hours, with several deaths along the way. Commentators are suggesting there is a sustainability issue around the number of people who are attempting to climb Mount Everest. You think?!

Photo credit: thestar.com

It was in 1953 that Sir Edmund Hilary and Tenzing Norgay became the first people to be…

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Humanity’s biggest own goals

Hard hitting thoughts on humanity. Thanks Matthew for your realistic outlook.

Matthew Wright

There’s no question in my mind that human-driven climate
change has to be one of the biggest own-goals humanity has ever struck on
itself. And we should have seen it coming. I mean, we’ve been pushing
combustion products into the atmosphere in ever-larger quantities since the
advent of industrialisation, over 200 years ago. We’ve been burning up fossil
fuels, polluting the environment, hacking down forests and generally creating
ecological mayhem at ever-increasing scale and speed. What did we think would
happen?

A beautiful picture of Earth from 1.6 million km sunwards. NASA, public domain.

When I say ‘one of’ the biggest own goals, to my thinking there’s only one other totally massive own-goal in the same league; the invention of nuclear weapons. And it’s a bigger one. The thing about human-driven climate change is that ultimately it’s not risking end-game. It’ll likely reduce what we call our civilisation. It’ll change…

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The Art of Life

Wise words for a dreary. rainy Friday!

I can't believe it!

These wise words are by Roman Emperor/ philosopher Marcus Aurelius. We have a natural inclination to reject the emergence of difficult circumstances or events that do not appear to be amenable, but there is usually a lesson and opportunity for growth.

“True understanding is to see the events of life in this way:
‘You are here for my benefit, though rumour paints you otherwise.’

And everything is turned to one’s advantage when he greets a situation like this:
You are the very thing I was looking for.

Truly whatever arises in life is the right material to bring about your growth and the growth of those around you.

This, in a word, is art — and this art called ‘life’ is a practice suitable to both men and gods.

Everything contains some special purpose and a hidden blessing;
what then could be strange or arduous when all of life…

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The Winning Sand Sculpture of the 2019 Texas Sand Sculpture Festival

Damon Langlois has been awarded 1st Place for his incredible sand sculpture, “Liberty Crumbling”, at the 2019 Texas SandFest. The 23rd annual Texas SandFest drew 35,000 people to Port Aransas, Texas and is recognized as the largest native-sand sculpture competition in the United States. Texas SandFest’s mission is to give back to the community by [...]

I’m pro-choice because I’m pro-life — Doubting Believer

Robby Robin's Journey

If people genuinely wish to live in a society that is truly pro-life, then promoting laws and programs that provide adequate support systems for those who are alive (quality public education for all, affordable and accessible health care, parental leave, care-giver support, support for parents of children with special needs, etc.) has to be more effective and humane than preventing safe abortions when necessary for complex and valid personal reasons. Anti-abortion is pro-birth, not pro-life. But Rev. Anne Russ, at her blog Doubting Believer, explains it so much better. You can read it at this link:  I’m pro-choice because I’m pro-life.

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My mother couldn’t choose her story’s end. This needs to change

KATHLEEN VENEMA CONTRIBUTED TO THE GLOBE AND MAIL PUBLISHED 2 DAYS AGO UPDATED MAY 9, 2019 Kathleen Venema is an associate professor of English at the University of Winnipeg and the author of Bird-Bent Grass: A Memoir, in Pieces, from which this essay is adapted. My mother and I were exceptionally close from the day [...]

Looking at aging with the glass half full

Thanks to John Persico for the original and much more thanks to Jane Fritz for such a positive outlook. It is indeed a privilege to live to 70 and still be healthy but with my many lumps that I have earned.

Robby Robin's Journey

“If you’re happy and you know it, clap your hands …” If everyone were to sing this well-known ditty, which age groups would clap the loudest? 1-5 year olds? 10-20 year olds? 40-50 year olds? 70-80 year olds?

If you were to read John Persico’s blog post from earlier this week (and he’s not always as negative as this), you would definitely think that it must be the 40-50 year olds, those at the peak of achieving the goals they started in their youth. He suggested that youth is a time of “getting” (friends, education, a career, a spouse, kids, a home, promotions, status, etc.), whereas old age is a time of “losing” (our careers, friends and family as they pass away, teeth, hair, eyesight, hearing, flexibility, dexterity, balance, our knees, our hips, our homes because we can’t climb the stairs, and our money to pay…

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