For First Nations, These Are Precedented Times

The pain of loss. Forced isolation. Unimaginable grief. We know them all. Hilistis Pauline Waterfall 22 May 2020 | TheTyee.ca Hilistis (pronounced Hee-lees-tees) Pauline Waterfall is a Heiltsuk woman who has lived and worked both within and outside of her community. She is an adjunct professor at Vancouver Island University and teaches in the First Nations Stewardship Tech [...]

The new normal

The new normal Posted on May 26, 2020 by maylynno photo by livescience.com This new concept is everywhere now, underpinning new behaviours, new reflexes, new apprehensions and a new way of life. The so called “new normal’ is a normal reaction to an aftermath. Knowing this fact, why to hate the new reality? Reality is a complex concept. [...]

Can humans go feral?

Posted on May 23, 2020 by Matthew Wright There was a story in the Guardian the other week about a real-life ‘Lord of the Flies’ adventure: six boys, hoping to escape life in Tonga, ended up cast away on a desert island for 18 months in 1966-67. They survived: and they did not become animals. On the contrary, they maintained the [...]

A ‘new normal’? It all depends what we want out of life

Here is something to really think about and not just blithely lay blame elsewhere.

Robby Robin's Journey

The question about what is most important in life is a very, very old one, and the answers never converge on universal agreement. It appears that this is not likely to change as the world navigates the challenges of a global pandemic. There is much talk in opinion pieces and among policy makers, politicians, and news commentators about what a ‘new normal’ might look like when we’re ready for it. Lots of comments about lessons learned from how different countries have approached the pandemic, what weaknesses have been exposed in existing government systems, and how we now have an opportunity – when we’re ready – to consider new ways of doing things as the economy ‘reopens’. Everyone has agreed, even if reluctantly, that not everything will be the same again. That the economy in any country won’t be able to just pick up and move along the same trajectory it…

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The pandemic is forcing us to recognize the brutal cruelty of nature

PAUL ABELACONTRIBUTED TO THE GLOBE AND MAILPUBLISHED 2 DAYS AGOUPDATED MAY 15, 202026 COMMENTSSHARE00:00Voice1x Scenic view from Lookoff River on Mabou Highland Conservation Land towards Mabou Mines and Cape Mabou Highlands Hiking Trails in Cape Breton are seen in this undated handout photo./THE CANADIAN PRESS Paul Abela is associate professor and acting head of Acadia University’s [...]

The Courage to Do Something — Cynthia Reyes

Ah yes the small things we often we miss and sometimes consciously!

Robby Robin's Journey

I wasn’t planning on posting anything on Mother’s Day, but when I read Cynthia Reyes’ post yesterday, The Courage to Do Something, I knew I had to reblog her message. Cynthia is a Canadian author, journalist, and human rights activist with a message important to us all. (Some of you may know her as the author of Myrtle the Purple Turtle or A Good Home.) We humans have done a very poor job of overcoming racism to date, despite laws to the contrary. In the end, it may be up to mothers – mothers of every colour of the rainbow – to overcome this shameful failing. White mothers especially, please don’t let the status quo survive, leaving mothers of colour to have to teach their children to be careful of white people and white law officials. Help make that be a childhood lesson that is no longer needed…

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America’s issue with socialism, so that’s what it’s all about

Robby Robin's Journey

I can’t have been alone in wondering over many, many years why so many Americans have such an aversion to ‘socialism’ even in its mildest forms, like universal healthcare.   Every other ‘developed’ country embraced what’s commonly called social democracy decades ago, in the aftermath of WWII, as have other countries. But not the U.S. As far as they’re concerned, it’s socialism.

I used to think that I understood the reason and that surely it would pass. My theory was that it was tied to the Cold War fear of communism and the thought that socialism would lead to communism. I reckoned that once enough time had passed they’d realize that wasn’t the case. However, I have now learned that this aversion to social rights has been at the core of American principles since at least the mid-1700s. That’s what individualism is all about. It explains a lot of things.

Full…

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