Getting relief from troubling times through nature – and maps

Thanks Jane for getting me to think again especially about travel. I would choose our own Arctic partially because I have spent some time in Labrador and learned to appreciate the solitude. Posted on June 29, 2020by Jane Fritz Today is Map Monday, but all the maps I’ve been looking at are awfully depressing. They seem to [...]

‘Normal Is the Problem’

So is normal’s idiot child, ‘the new normal.’ What we’ve made normal never was natural. Andrew Nikiforuk 30 May 2020 | TheTyee.ca Tyee contributing editor Andrew Nikiforuk’s 2006 book Pandemonium predicted the pandemic we are now living. Let’s review what ‘normal’ human behaviour has done to our one and only home over the past few centuries. Image of Earth taken from [...]

The Dangerous Gnat

Nasty little critters but essential food for many birds and bats.

I can't believe it!

We used to call them gnats in Lincoln. The Spanish call them mosquitoes (diminutive for mosca – fly). It was many years before I realised these are the same thing, basically, although there are different sorts.

For us they were just pesky nuisances, but this is mankind’s ‘deadliest predator’. How come? The answer: malaria. In 2018 there were 228,000,000 new cases and 400,000 died, but few in the ‘developed world’.

For millennia people got the ague, got sick and many died. It even decided major events, such as Hannibal’s failed assault on Rome, the limits of Alexander the Great’s conquering. It was thought to be bad air that caused it (mal-aria).

Eventually mankind found the cure – draining swamps and quinine, a refined variant of which, hydroxychloroquine, has been in the news recently. Of course, a lot of the world can’t afford these solutions.

This reminded me of a trip…

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For First Nations, These Are Precedented Times

The pain of loss. Forced isolation. Unimaginable grief. We know them all. Hilistis Pauline Waterfall 22 May 2020 | TheTyee.ca Hilistis (pronounced Hee-lees-tees) Pauline Waterfall is a Heiltsuk woman who has lived and worked both within and outside of her community. She is an adjunct professor at Vancouver Island University and teaches in the First Nations Stewardship Tech [...]

The new normal

The new normal Posted on May 26, 2020 by maylynno photo by livescience.com This new concept is everywhere now, underpinning new behaviours, new reflexes, new apprehensions and a new way of life. The so called “new normal’ is a normal reaction to an aftermath. Knowing this fact, why to hate the new reality? Reality is a complex concept. [...]

Can humans go feral?

Posted on May 23, 2020 by Matthew Wright There was a story in the Guardian the other week about a real-life ‘Lord of the Flies’ adventure: six boys, hoping to escape life in Tonga, ended up cast away on a desert island for 18 months in 1966-67. They survived: and they did not become animals. On the contrary, they maintained the [...]

A ‘new normal’? It all depends what we want out of life

Here is something to really think about and not just blithely lay blame elsewhere.

Robby Robin's Journey

The question about what is most important in life is a very, very old one, and the answers never converge on universal agreement. It appears that this is not likely to change as the world navigates the challenges of a global pandemic. There is much talk in opinion pieces and among policy makers, politicians, and news commentators about what a ‘new normal’ might look like when we’re ready for it. Lots of comments about lessons learned from how different countries have approached the pandemic, what weaknesses have been exposed in existing government systems, and how we now have an opportunity – when we’re ready – to consider new ways of doing things as the economy ‘reopens’. Everyone has agreed, even if reluctantly, that not everything will be the same again. That the economy in any country won’t be able to just pick up and move along the same trajectory it…

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The pandemic is forcing us to recognize the brutal cruelty of nature

PAUL ABELACONTRIBUTED TO THE GLOBE AND MAILPUBLISHED 2 DAYS AGOUPDATED MAY 15, 202026 COMMENTSSHARE00:00Voice1x Scenic view from Lookoff River on Mabou Highland Conservation Land towards Mabou Mines and Cape Mabou Highlands Hiking Trails in Cape Breton are seen in this undated handout photo./THE CANADIAN PRESS Paul Abela is associate professor and acting head of Acadia University’s [...]