The pandemic is forcing us to recognize the brutal cruelty of nature

PAUL ABELACONTRIBUTED TO THE GLOBE AND MAILPUBLISHED 2 DAYS AGOUPDATED MAY 15, 202026 COMMENTSSHARE00:00Voice1x Scenic view from Lookoff River on Mabou Highland Conservation Land towards Mabou Mines and Cape Mabou Highlands Hiking Trails in Cape Breton are seen in this undated handout photo./THE CANADIAN PRESS Paul Abela is associate professor and acting head of Acadia University’s [...]

The Courage to Do Something — Cynthia Reyes

Ah yes the small things we often we miss and sometimes consciously!

Robby Robin's Journey

I wasn’t planning on posting anything on Mother’s Day, but when I read Cynthia Reyes’ post yesterday, The Courage to Do Something, I knew I had to reblog her message. Cynthia is a Canadian author, journalist, and human rights activist with a message important to us all. (Some of you may know her as the author of Myrtle the Purple Turtle or A Good Home.) We humans have done a very poor job of overcoming racism to date, despite laws to the contrary. In the end, it may be up to mothers – mothers of every colour of the rainbow – to overcome this shameful failing. White mothers especially, please don’t let the status quo survive, leaving mothers of colour to have to teach their children to be careful of white people and white law officials. Help make that be a childhood lesson that is no longer needed…

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America’s issue with socialism, so that’s what it’s all about

Robby Robin's Journey

I can’t have been alone in wondering over many, many years why so many Americans have such an aversion to ‘socialism’ even in its mildest forms, like universal healthcare.   Every other ‘developed’ country embraced what’s commonly called social democracy decades ago, in the aftermath of WWII, as have other countries. But not the U.S. As far as they’re concerned, it’s socialism.

I used to think that I understood the reason and that surely it would pass. My theory was that it was tied to the Cold War fear of communism and the thought that socialism would lead to communism. I reckoned that once enough time had passed they’d realize that wasn’t the case. However, I have now learned that this aversion to social rights has been at the core of American principles since at least the mid-1700s. That’s what individualism is all about. It explains a lot of things.

Full…

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Global Boom, Pandemic, Crash: Is History Just Repeating Itself?

If Peter Turchin is right, we face the end of a 300-year cycle, as did previous far-flung empires. Andrew Nikiforuk Yesterday | TheTyee.caTyee contributing editor Andrew Nikiforuk’s 2006 book Pandemonium predicted the pandemic we are now living. The intensification of globalized networks creates more instability, insecurity and unpredictability. Epidemics can hasten the ends of ‘secular cycles’ for highly-interconnected civilizations. Image: Shutterstock. [...]

Six lessons learned from the Covid-19 lockdown

Good advice.

maylynno

empty_street_pandemic_1024 photo by sciencealert.com

As countries are preparing to go back to normal life, I can’t help looking back to the lockdown experience as a period of time where I was forced, like the rest of us, to new habits and ways to survive and live through this strange pause. I have learned important lessons for life whether there will be another wave of Covid-19 (I hope not) or not.

Here are the lessons I learned:

  • Step away from news. In stressful times like these, being constantly glued to your computer or phone and reading/watching news is not the best thing to do. In spite of being tempted to do it, and just for the record, fake news outnumbered the true ones. So, let alone being obsessive about knowing more can cause stress, but also not all is true. I limited myself to one hour per day to read or watch…

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